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Long intimidating immense and rational derangement of all the senses

long intimidating immense and rational derangement of all the senses-14

And in mechanized form as well.'The Spears of Twilight'.

long intimidating immense and rational derangement of all the senses-86long intimidating immense and rational derangement of all the senses-89long intimidating immense and rational derangement of all the senses-65long intimidating immense and rational derangement of all the senses-56

He was attempting (according to letters at the time) to develop a method for attaining poetical transcendence or visionary power through a “long, intimidating, immense and rational derangement of all the senses.The idea is to reach the unknown by the derangement of all the senses.It involves enormous suffering, but one must be strong and be a born poet. Rimbaud, like a lot of great travelers, was a bit queer.French anthropologists tend to be erudite intellectuals rather than data-obsessed fieldworkers and in this context the influence of a poète maudit on an ethnologist are actually well rehearsed.James Clifford's goes a long way to explain how French anthropology is almost a fully surrealist study with Debord and Bataille hovering over it with all their intellectual dominance.The quote itself affirms the connection by linking the psychogeographic, synaesthetic effects of twilight with Baudelaire, but what aesthetics was Descola thinking of exactly?

Submerged in its green monotones, nature here is not of the kind to inspire a painter.

The sufferings are enormous, but one must be strong, be born a poet, and I have recognized myself as a poet".

William Burroughs cited this as his aim when he wrote Naked Luch, only later with the cut-up can he be said to have fully achieved it.

- But, I beg of you not to underscore with your pencil, nor - too much - with your thought: The Tortured Heart My poor heart dribbles at the stern.... Ithypallic, erkish, lewd, Their gibes have corrupted it; At the vespers they are making frescos Ithypallic, erkish, lewd; O abracadantic waves Take my heart that it may be saved! The romantics, who prove so well that the song is so rarely the work, that is to say, the sung and understood thought of the singer? If the old fools had not found only the false significance of the Ego, we should not now be having to sweep away these millions of skeletons which, since an infinite time,! The study of this past charmed the curious: many of them delight in reviving these antiquities: - it is for them.

My poor heart dribbles at the stern Under the gibes of the whole crew Which burst out in a single laugh, My poor heart dribbles at the stern My heart full of caporal! That is obvious to me: I witness the unfolding of my thought: I watch it, I listen to it: I make a stoke of the bow: the symphony makes movement into the depths, or comes in one leap upon the stage.

Still you slice the sirloin into pieces and feed each other on silver forks under the approving gaze of a waiter whose purchased attention and French name are a kind of candlelight themselves, while in the background the fingertips of the pianist float over the tusksv of the slaughtered elephant without a care, as if the elephant had granted its permission.