skip to content »

centr-geoteh.ru

More dating old photographs family chronicle

more dating old photographs family chronicle-65

The Photographic Archives at the Stamford Historical Society hold over 10,000 images, dating back to Civil War times.The photographs provide a rich pictorial history of the growth and development of Stamford; its people, industries, government, and communities.

more dating old photographs family chronicle-77more dating old photographs family chronicle-39more dating old photographs family chronicle-3more dating old photographs family chronicle-23

In 1813 the work was re-published as "The History and Antiquities of Hawstead and Hardwick in the County of Suffolk." Sir John had died in 1785, but the new edition, which was limited to 230 copies, included his own corrections, as well as notes by his brother, Sir Thomas Gery Cullum, and 7 new plates.Following Britain's Linked Ring, which promoted artistic photography from the 1880s, Alfred Stieglitz encouraged several women to join the Photo-Secession movement which he founded in 1902 in support of so-called pictorialism.In Vienna, Dora Kallmus pioneered the use of photographic studios as fashionable meeting places for the Austro-Hungarian aristocracy.It was above all in northern Europe that women first entered the business of photography, opening studios in Denmark, France, Germany, and Sweden from the 1840s, while it was in Britain that women from well-to-do families developed photography as an art in the late 1850s.Not until the 1890s did the first studios run by women open in New York City.Much like how genealogical resources and classes are helpful to discovering and sharing your family story, knowing some photography history can also be beneficial when it comes to identifying origins of old photos.

The following common types of vintage photos, their photographic processes and characteristics could help you positively identify some of your long-lost ancestors.

Daguerreotypes were sealed in glass for protection.

In America, daguerreotypes were often placed in hinged, wooden cases with paper or leather coverings.

The daguerreotype was created by Louis Jacques Mande Daguerre and is known by photography experts as the first practical form of photography.

Daguerreotypes were produced on a thin copper metal support that had a polished coating of silver that was mirror-like.

The involvement of women in photojournalism also had its beginnings in the early 1900s but slowly picked up during World War I.