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Moving to Pune (Poona) in 1974, he established an ashram that attracted increasing numbers of Westerners.

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In fact, it made even more of an impression on the gallery's floor, as if you look carefully, you can still see traces of the artwork (now filled in with cement) more than a decade later.By the end of the 1970s, there were mounting tensions with the Indian government and the surrounding society.In 1981, Osho relocated to the United States, and his followers established an intentional community, later known as Rajneeshpuram, in the state of Oregon.One of the ventilation shafts for the tunnel in these plans was to be located by the then-disused power station on the banks of the Thames.Take a moment to admire the 4.2million bricks that make up the old power station; and the 99m (325 ft) high chimney, specifically built to be lower than the dome of St Paul’s Cathedral at 114m (375 ft).) (December 11, 1931 – January 19, 1990), also known as Acharya Rajneesh from the 1960s onwards, calling himself Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh during the 1970s and 1980s and taking the name Osho in 1989, was an Indian mystic and spiritual teacher.

A professor of philosophy, he travelled throughout India in the 1960s as a public speaker, raising controversy by speaking against socialism, Mahatma Gandhi, and institutionalised religion.

I write about big ideas and give life advice that doesn’t suck.

It's been a nice ride, but all things eventually come to an end.

When Tate Modern opened in May 2000, its non-chronological display of art was considered something of a challenge.

Not many art galleries were showing their collections in this way at the time.

The Bankside Power Station, that now houses Tate Modern might look like a pretty permanent piece of London's skyline, but we nearly lost it once.