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Updating from xp to window 7

Did Windows Vista scare you off updating your PC so much that you let Windows 7 and 8 pass you by?Well, the time has come for you to move on because full XP support is no more, starting today. governments, for example, paid Microsoft a few million dollars to extend support for a year, The Guardian reported. Well, if any bugs are found after Tuesday, Microsoft won't be fixing them, though it will support antimalware signatures for XP through July 14, 2015. At its recent Build conference, Microsoft lowered the system requirements for Windows 8.1 so more machines can upgrade to the latest OS.

Windows XP does not allow you to perform an in-place upgrade to Windows 7.This is where were tackle the question “what should I do if I am still running Microsoft XP?”For an OS that’s three releases behind the times, this shouldn’t be big news, but XP has proved remarkably tenacious.XP has been around since 2001, which means that you've really had more than enough time to let it go. A number of businesses, not to mention governments, still rely on XP-based systems. There's also the fact that you're running a 13-year-old OS so you'd likely see better performance if you upgrade. The requirements for Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 are now: If you don't have this and you want to upgrade, then it's time for a new laptop or desktop.But if you want to give upgrades a shot, here's how to proceed.Updating drivers is also a great troubleshooting step when the device is having some kind of problem or is generating an error, like a Device Manager error code.

A driver update isn't always a fix-it task, either.

Among other things, this means no more monthly fixes to protect against new viruses and malware.

Anybody still using XP will be stuck with the OS as it stands on that final day, and you can expect any security vulnerabilities subsequently discovered to be ruthlessly targeted.

Net Applications measured 31.2% of the world’s PCs still running XP in October 2013.

That’s a problem: when Microsoft stops supporting an OS, it doesn’t only withdraw its technical-support services – it also stops updating the software.

This is the OEM or 'original equipment manufacturer' version.