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Victorian era dating

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Women, on the other hand, had it even worse than they did during the Renaissance period. As any American Civil War general could tell you, having a powerful set of mutton chops or a massive beard was a symbol that you were a man’s man.

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Women of the middle and upper classes were expected to conform to the sentimental idealization promoted by the literature and art of the time.Society viewed courtship as a career move for men and a woman’s way of securing her position in life and security for her children.A Victorian man could amass great wealth simply by choosing a woman of great means, as her property would transfer to the man once married.Women and men also faced strict rules regarding courtship.The notion of two people falling wildly and madly in love and running away into the night, regardless of the opinions of their families or plan for the future was not something commonplace to the upper and middle class.The Victorian era is defined as the years from 1837 until 1901 as this was the time in which Queen Victoria ruled England.

There is no exact date as to when the Victorian era truly ended as the Victorian lifestyle continued to influence culture, customs, and societal ways for several years following Queen Victoria’s death.

Needless to say, deciding who you should marry is a major choice and should never be entered into lightly or while drinking alcohol.

So the process of courtship has always been a big deal, even though it has changed dramatically over the years.

Queen Victoria’s son, King Edward VII ruled from 1901 until 1910 and historians refer to these years as the Edwardian era; however, throughout this period, Victorian influence was strong.

Women and men who held greater standards of morality and social etiquette marked the Victorian era. Societal norms taught men and women to behave with modesty and prudence.

The Victorian era began with Queen Victoria’s coronation in 1837 and ended with her death in 1901.